Tag Archives: ALP Stuffups

Give us a break, Bill

TONY Abbott should reveal the negative impacts of free trade with China, Bill Shorten says, accusing the government of “selective leaks to soften up the electorate” for painful concessions to Beijing.

Hypocrisy, thy name is ALP.  Bill, how about you reveal the negative impacts of the Joe Ludwig’s closure of the live export trade to Indonesia before you say anything about this deal with China.

It could could well help the cattle industry recover from your stuff-up.

Cattle producers launch class action

NORTHERN cattle producers and exporters have launched a class action against the commonwealth, challenging the “reckless’’ decision by the Gillard government in 2011 to ban live animal exports to Indonesia.

Northern Territory cattle producers Dougal and Emily Brett who run Waterloo Station, about 540km from Katherine, are the lead applicants. The couple had cattle worth about $1.4 million in their yards ready to be exported to Indonesia when trade was halted. The ban up-ended their lives and their industry.

The ban up-ended the lives of thousands of people and the industry and represents one of the worst decisions ever made by the Rudd/Gillard/Rudd debacle.  I was travelling through North West Western Australia and the Northern Territory shortly after the shock announcement and the hatred against the government was palpable.

Ludwig, the minister who closed down the industry, will never be welcomed west of Brisbane yet I notice he is still a Queensland Senator.  It’s a pity he can’t be held financially responsible for the decision but unfortunately, any costs awarded will just taken out of federal revenue and only people who remember will apportion the costs, albeit only in their mind, against the costs of electing an ALP government.

Australia never really recovered from the Whitlam experiment and now we have billions to sort out from the most recent ALP experiment.

It’s time now Gough

whitlamGough Whitlam, the 21st Australian prime minister, passed away earlier this morning. He served as PM between 1972 and 1975 before being sacked by the Governor-General and subsequently, by the electorate,  at the 1975 general election.

As a young Infantry Sergeant I was called before my Officer Commanding and formally asked if I would continue to serve without pay in the event that Fraser maintained his attempt to rid Australia of Whitlam and his decaying government and supply dried up.

I answered in the affirmative recognizing the country needed to stave off bankruptcy and only suggested if the stalemate continued then the Army needed a plan to feed my wife and child.

I have dreaded this day, not so much because of the man’s demise, but more because we now have to endure weeks of canonization by the media of a man who, at best, we can say, his road to hell was paved with good intentions.

The Left, and those who either ignore facts or make them up, will be working overtime to give him credit where none is due and to wash over his errors.

And they start;

He was good for women

Tanya Plibersek:

Gough’s reforms for women were landmark. They included the election of the first Labor woman to the House of Representatives, Joan Child, in 1974.

She means other than Dame Enid Lyons who was elected to the House in the early 40s.

He cut Tariffs 

Sure did.  Tim Colebatch explains;

John Stone, deputy secretary of Treasury at the time, wrote recently that the committee’s existence was kept secret even from Treasury. Stone wrote a memo endorsing lower tariffs as a goal, but arguing that an indiscriminate cut would leave excessively protected sectors unharmed, but close more vulnerable plants.

And sure enough;

A year later, after the tariff cuts, import volumes jumped by a third, and the current account deficit was here to stay. Manufacturing lost 138,000 jobs in two years, and high unemployment became entrenched. The tariff cuts were only one factor in all this, but they symbolised the defects in Whitlam’s “crash through or crash” style of decision-making.

He instituted free Uni education.

Sure did and those who gained by that move have reason to be complimentary to Gough but in life there are no free dinners and someone had to pay.  The taxpayer paid and in due course Hawke adjusted the scheme and brought in costs to students.

He brought the troops home from Vietnam.

No he didn’t.  All he did was bring home the few Training Team guys still left in country.  1 ATF had been withdrawn by the McMahon government before Whitlam cam to power.

From Wikipedia;

On 18 August 1971, Australia and New Zealand decided to withdraw their troops from Vietnam, with the Australian prime minister, William McMahon, announcing that 1 ATF would cease operations in October, commencing a phased withdrawal.

I’ve almost given up correcting Whitlam lovers on this one but as they maintain the rage, I will maintain telling them the truth.

Financial management.

Whitlam-Legacy

As mentioned above, his road to hell was paved with good intentions, but, like the Rudd/Gillard/Rudd government the great programs were never placed against the balance sheet to see if we could afford them.

We couldn’t.

In this graph from Catallaxy file Professor Sinclair says, Australia never recovered from the Whitlam era.  I might add Whitlam tried to fund his grandiose schemes but did so by trying to borrow money from the Arabs.  The Khemlani Affair put the icing on the cake as it became apparent to all that they were out of control.  It gave Fraser the impetus to deny supply that ended in Whitlam’s dismissal

 Whitlam opened up dialogue with China.

Yep. he sure did.  He visited China as Opposition leader in  June of 1971 and whereas establishing diplomatic relations with China had to be considered, I would have preferred he wait until our troops had been withdrawn or otherwise recovered from, or died of their wounds.  Troops were still in Vietnam (4RAR left in October 1971) and while our troops were being killed or wounded by the VC or North Vietnamese, these communist soldiers were just aiming the rifles.  China was busy making the AK 47s and loading the magazines and for the years from 1972 thru to 1975,  they rearmed North Vietnam, in partnership with the USSR, to enable the 1975 invasion.

I took it that Whitlam favoured the Chinese communists over the sacrifice of the Diggers and while he later had Jim Cairns as his deputy I can understand why.  If Whitlam was iffy, Jim Cairns was an out and out communist and did all he could to assist the communists to win the war.

I thought recognition was a bit early – wait until my mate’s bodies are cold in their grave, I thought at the time.

He instituted Multiculturalism.

Yep he did.  With the exception that the South Vietnamese who fought his communist mates weren’t included in his version of multiculturalism. He is quoted as saying;

“I’m not having hundreds of fucking Vietnamese Balts coming into this country with their religious and political hatreds against us!”

If the Vietnamese hated anybody, other than the communists who were busy murdering and raping their countrymen, it could only be politicians who said such things.  The religious Vietnamese he talks about were, on the main, Catholics with some Buddhists thrown in.  The only reason he could hate them so is because they were fighting the communists.

As a further example of his political leanings he denied any reports of violations in communist SE Asia;

‘In September 1978, Whitlam addressed a conference in Canberra where he declared that he did not accept the validity of any of the reports about human rights violations in Vietnam, Cambodia or Laos. He was particularly emphatic about Cambodia, declaring: “I make bold to doubt all the stories that appear in the newspapers about the treatment of people in Cambodia.”‘

He supported Jim Cairns until he had to sack him over treasury matters.  He never sacked him while he was courting the communists.

Australia’s Dr Jim Cairns and the Soviet KGB
by John Ballantyne
National Observer (Council for the National Interest, Melbourne),
No. 64, Autumn 2005, pages 52-63.

When he was a senior Cabinet minister in the Whitlam Government, Cairns set out to use his high office to promote Soviet foreign policy aims. In 1973, when he was Minister for Overseas Trade and Secondary Industry, he sponsored a visit to Australia of representatives of communist North Vietnam. On April 26 — the day after Anzac Day — Cairns was photographed with his guests in the Sydney Town Hall, surrounded by Viet Cong flags and a huge picture of dictator Ho Chi Minh.

In 1974, official letterhead stationery of the Australian WPC described Cairns both as President of the Committee of World Peace Councillors in Australia and as Deputy Prime Minister. One such letter, dated 2 September 1974, advertised a visit to Australia later that month of a WPC delegation, headed by long-time KGB agent and WPC leader, Romesh Chandra.

It is worth remembering that Australia’s Constitution (section 44) clearly states: “Any person who … is under any acknowledgement of allegiance, obedience, or adherence to a foreign power … shall be incapable of being chosen or of sitting as a senator or member of the House of Representatives.” Cairns’s loyalties to a foreign power — and an enemy foreign power at that — should have automatically disqualified him from sitting as a member of parliament, let alone from becoming Deputy Prime Minister.

It is little wonder, then, that when Cairns became Deputy PM on 10 June 1974, the then US Ambassador to Australia, Marshall Green, warned Labor Prime Minister Gough Whitlam of Washington’s alarm that Cairns might have access to classified information on US bases in Australia. Whitlam assured Green that Cairns had not asked about the functions of the US bases and would not be briefed on the matter.

I never looked up to him, always thought he and I were on different sides but he certainly caused a lot of debate and even though he could never fund his grandiose ideas he did at least have them.  It wasn’t an untimely death but I dread the media over the period between now and his state funeral and will stay away from the ABC lest I throw something at my expensive TV in frustration at the lies that are about to wash over us.

November 11 1975 was a big relief and a highlight in my life.

Vale Gough.

Good luck, Joel

LABOR frontbencher Joel Fitzgibbon says the party must attract better candidates and boost its campaigning in rural Australia, as well as revitalising its policies for farmers and regional communities, or it will fail to regain government.

“Australia has 44 rural electorates,” Mr Fitzgibbon said. “The Labor Party holds just five of them.

“Two are held by independents. The Tories (He means the Coalition – Tories are Brits!)  hold the rest — some 84 per cent. In the past 30 years, Labor has held no more than 13 rural electorates. This must change — not for Labor’s sake, but for the sake of all rural communities.”

Here’s a tip Joel.  Tell the rural communities that under no circumstances will the ALP ever, ever close down an entire rural industry as they did with the live cattle export trade, based on an ABC TV show, and if, and it’s a big if, they believe you, you might stand a chance of gaining some rural seats.

For that matter, how the hell do they even hold five seats – what are the voters in those electorates thinking?

Considering that Joel was called an auto electrician in a suit by General Cantwell I can’t see him recognizing, let alone addressing, ALP failures.  With Shorten in denial and the ALP continually blocking the Coalition’s  attempts to wind back spending, the punters can see they haven’t learnt any lessons from the election.

Joe Ludwig, who was the Senator responsible for closing down the live cattle trade, is still in the Senate – a veritable time bomb ticking quietly as he waits for the opportunity to totally stuff up some other industry.

Tick…tick…tick

 

AWU wants RET exemption

THE Australian Workers Union has called for the aluminium ­industry to be exempted from the renewable energy target, a move that will increase pressure on Labor to negotiate a bipartisan deal with the Coalition on changes to the scheme.

AWU national secretary Scott McDine warned that the RET maintained in its current form would lead to thousands of jobs shifting overseas with no ­environmental gain.

The closure of smelters at Kurri Kurri in NSW, Point Henry in Victoria and Gove in the Northern Territory have been announced in the past two years.

But….we always knew that.  Did they mention this fact to Rudd and Gillard as they beavered away at ridding Australia of its cheap power advantage at the Greens bequest.

No, not a peep as I recall.

The AWU don’t care about the environment, they just care about jobs.  But before we get all warm and fuzzy about unions looking after the workers, we are really talking about jobs that translate into membership fees that represent power and money for the union bosses.

So with the aluminium industry in serious decline due partly to the ALP’s insane ‘save the environment’ policies that didn’t and wont save the environment, we are still stalling over what to do with the RET.

Rabid dog Palmer, leader of the PUP pack has no investment in aluminium so has nor reason to  vote for reconsidering the RET policies.

He’s no help.

No change there.

Supporters of the RET say look at the figures.  Electricity demand is down.  Yes it is, but might I suggest that part of the reason for decrease is that people are getting stunned by their power bills and are switching off heating and bar fridges and stumbling around in the dark as they minimize lights.

The closure of three aluminium smelting plants has or will impact on that demand as well.

Mind you, aluminium smelting isn’t the only industry suffering from the ALP/Greens policies.  All industry is as we chip away at that useful cheap power advantage.

Insane.

UPDATE:  Read Alan Moran’s piece at Catalaxy Files where he asks should we phase down or abolish?

Shorten hits Peak Stupid

shortenBill Shorten has no shame – during the Rudd/Gillard/Rudd debacle the government gutted the Defence budget in a vain attempt to balance Swan’s budget.  The budget didn’t balance and Defence aquisition programmes were put back years.

Now he has the temerity to attack Abbott over the fact that a Japanese sub is one of many being considered to replace the Collins class fleet. His populist statements at Adelaide yesterday reflect his fighting for the unions, including the criminal based CFMEU, that were involved in the Collins class subs and has nothing to do with the defence of the country.

One union idiot shouted “Last time we had Jap subs, they were in bloody Sydney Harbour” referring to the midget submarine attack in 1942. I hasten to add that neither Shorten, nor his audience were even born then.  It was another century and another Japan.  Today’s Japan is a major defence and trade partner who, with the US and Australia, constitute the main Pacific area defence pact.

Shorten goes onto say; “This is a government with a short memory,” he said. “In the Second World War, 366 merchant ships were sunk off Australia.”

Short memory!  From Wikipedia;

The 28 Japanese and German submarines that operated in Australian waters between 1942 and 1945 sank a total of 30 ships with a combined tonnage of 151,000 long tons (153,000 t); 654 people, including 200 Australian merchant seamen, were killed on board the ships attacked by submarines.

Even when he gives a speech he can’t get it right.  There were 18 more ships sunk but they were as a result of  surface raiders, both German and Japanese, but I presumed Shortens populist spray was directed at the Japanese only.

German….hmmn.  Their submarines are also in the mix for selection.  The cost of 12 German submarines would cost us  $20 billion,  The Japanese  Soryu Class submarine would come at a similar cost while should Australia go Shorten’s way it would cost us $50 billion.

$30 billion cheaper – you would have to consider it and think what you could do with that money.  Maybe it could go to paying off some of the debt Shorten’s mob have left us.

Due to the fact that the ALP killed Defence planning with their budget cuts we have a potential problem of having gap with no submarines at all.  For this reason, and considering costs, something the ALP never did, the Japanese solution looks like a winner.

Quicker and cheaper potentially eliminating the no-submarine gap.

The decision is due later this year and I’m sure that a lot of the work will be done in Australia if the project goes ahead but from my point of view, the less union involvement the better.

 

Aint it the truth

From today’s Australian writing about Carmen Lawrence from Western Australia as she takes over as Premier in 1990

Like most socialists she labours under the misconception that wealth is fixed.  The creation of wealth seems not to bother her. Indeed it destracts from the business of spending….

That explains most ALP governments that have existed in my time.

Union membership plummets

UNION membership across the workforce has fallen to its lowest level, with just 12 per cent of private-sector employees choosing to belong to organised labour.

Overall, unions lost almost 93,000 members in the 12 months to last August, with total membership falling to 1.74 million, Australian Bureau of Statistics ­figures show.

ACTU secretary Dave Oliver blamed job cuts and changes in the economy and ­labour market for the decline.

“The No 1 recruiter for the trade union movement is Tony Abbott,’’ he said. “Australians aren’t going to stand by while the Abbott government and the business lobby go after their penalty rates, seek to cut the minimum wage every year for 10 years and conduct the biggest assault on the social safety net this country has ever seen

How’s that for a “I’m not paying attention” type of statement.  Union membership plummets, more than likely as a result of it becoming apparent, even to rusted on ALP supporters, that fraud is rampant in the Union movement as their leaders operate for their own benefit and not that of their members.

Somehow, in his confused mind,  the fall actually is not a fall at all as he casts Abbott as the No 1 recruiter for the unions.  Abbott recruits but the numbers fall – well done Tony.

Thus now we have the ALP/Union movement representing just 12% of workforce and people still believe that a representation of such a tiny part of the workforce entitles them to government.

Good luck with that!

 

Budget woes

The shouting and tumult dies down as the media have allowed every single person dependant on government largesse to vacilitate wildly and often about the budget.  The attacks aginst the Abbott and Hockey have been sustained and not without some bias.  The ABC did particularly well with Vilma Ward, a Queensland left wing radical activist, being presented as a concerned Pensioner and a sex-line grandmother (there are some sick men out there!) who claims to have been forced into the sleaze business to help pay her rent.  When she come on-line ABC’s Faine smiled at Abbott and he winked back.  The furore from “The Wink” has gone viral as Faine managed to have a convenient video available even though the ABC claim they didn’t know who she was. Bullshit – they always know who their callers are and what they are likely to go on about.

They don’t just let anyone call, they must be anti-coalition to get a voice and call-id allows them to select callers who have a proven track record of agreeing with the ABC and it’s self-perceived role as opposition to any conservative government.

Glooria, who is actually Judith Power, is a long-time feminist activist and anarchist but insists she has never been a member of a political party, even though Liberal Party twitter accounts claim she is an ALP branch secretary.

In an amusing twist, this sex-line elderly anarchist and radical feminist, who by her own background defines sleeze, accuses Abbott of being a sleazy misogynist.

The hypocracy!

Some sense is rising out of the tumult but there is a lot of work to be done by Abbott and Hockey.  Their efforts at selling the budget have been poor to say the least  and quite a few have been disappointed that they weren’t more savage in their cuts.

The fight now is all about getting the budget through the Senate  and the new Senate, due to sit in July, comes with it’s own problems that occassion dispair at the offerings.

Particularly dispairing to me is the fact that Palmer’s roll call of Senators in both his party and alligned Independants will have the final say in alot of the budget final make-up

PUP senators Zhenya Wang, Jacqui Lambie and Glenn Lazaruswill be part of the balance of power and to look closely at one of them, Jacqui Lambie from Tasmania, despair can easily turn to depression.

Jacqui Lambie is an ex soldier and a shallow thinker.

  •  She advocates national service as a means to fix youth unemployment.
  • believes “hitting welfare” is not the way the Government should be finding savings and the nation needs “other ideas”
  • believes the economy is in good shape and the Prime Minister and Treasurer are panicking.
  • believes Abbott and Joe Hockey are nothing less than a pair of deceitful, lying political politicians,” 
  • believes abuse was an “intractable problem” in the ADF and made such allegations against the ADF that motivated General Hurlley to make an unprecedented intervention suggesting she calm down.

None of which bodes well for civilization.

Ricky Muir from the Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party, has signed an agreement to vote along PUP lines but seriously, I always worry about single issue politicians.  Does he have a solid background in business or economics that would indicate some rational thought might be attached to his vote in the Senate? His party claim to want to have a “national conversation” about safer driving but I worry that he  posted a video – subsequently deleted from the internet – showing his eight-year-old daughter driving a car and doing ”burnouts”.

Now that’s a good start to have about safer driving….not!

Independent senator Nick Xenophon, who is already on record as saying the budget will not pass in it’s current form and adds that the budget itself is unfair, mean and shortsited, doesn’t appear to be thinking about the big picture.  Other that saving a few millions by forcing MPs to travell cattle class he doesn’t  to offer up any solutions to the nations problems.

Liberal Democrat David Leyonhjelm has some opinions that resonate but suggesting a radical plan to charge asylum-seekers $50000 to come to Australia isn’t one of them.

I wouldn’t like to comment on Family First’s Bob Day but you could follow the link and decide yourself whether he will help or hinder our recovery

The Democratic Labour Party’s John Madigan doesn’t appear to be radical and well may help the situation.

Amidst all this is Shorten in denial about the cause of our current financial budget woes and I have still to hear him make any positive statement or suggestion as to how we might alleviate the situation that he and his cohorts created in the first place.

It aint going to be easy!

Polls down for Abbott

SUPPORT for the Coalition has plunged to its lowest level in almost four years and voter dis­satisfaction with Tony Abbott has jumped to the highest point since he became Prime Minister as the government prepares to deliver across-the-board pain in its first budget.

Amazing, isn’t it? The poor bastard has to fix a huge deficit left by the ALP and he is in trouble.

Mind you it’s totally expected. With the media, the ALP, every organization that lives off government handouts and the weird left wing screaming about mean Abbott and amongst all that, nobody, least of all Shorten, are calling it for what it is – a budget to try and get us out of the very deep hole the ALP have left us.

There is a fair chance the rich are going to pay for it. Bit unfair really because they didn’t cause it and are highly unlikely to have vote the spendthifts in. In a perfect world we would be able to isolate those who did vote them in, particularly the second ALP government, and give them the bill.

Wont happen of course.

What will happen, what has happened since Whitlam got booted, is that the Libs come in to fix the deficits. Over the first year hard decisions are made and their polls plummet with too many people thinking ME and not the country. LNP management starts to produce results and the polls climb to give them another run at government. The country stabilizes, surpluses appear and productivity lifts after union power is curtailed. Everythin’s rosy, people get complacent and with the memory span of a lightening bolt, forget how bad the ALP is at managing finances and everything else except looking after the unions and they fucking vote them back in.

The mysteries of the cycle of life.

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