Tag Archives: ALP Stuffups

Burke makes it harder

In the face of Mining companies claiming the ALP are making it to hard to invest in projects Tony Burke has an answer.

Make it harder!

MINING companies could be forced to invest directly in protecting seagrass meadows thousands of kilometres from their own export facilities as a condition of future port developments.

The radical plan to extend seagrass protection will be floated by federal Environment Minister Tony Burke in a landmark speech to the Coast to Coast Conference in Brisbane today. In a speech prepared for the conference, Mr Burke said seagrass covering 95,000sq km, or 1.5 times the size of Tasmania, was under threat and the missing link in coastal protection.

Boats still coming

Gee, the ALP Nauru plan isn’t working!

The linked article points out that under the Howard plan the boats stopped while under Gilllard’s plan it’s business as usual.

The difference? Despite the obvious lack of TPVs the boat people realized Howard really meant to stop the boats while they have clearly interpreted Gillard’s plan as having no teeth. As I have said previously, she only did something to get the boat people off the front page.

It’ll simply get worse as the ALP move onto new innovative and previously unheard of ways of stuffing the economy.

Twitter Based Policy

Policy by Twitter seams to be Joe Ludwig’s forte as he ruins another business based on activists from Greenpeace and Getup! running an email and Twitter campaign. Worked well when Joe shattered the live animal export business and sent hundreds of businesses to the wall so why not run it again.

POLITICAL strategists and social media experts have warned governments not to make policy on the run while MPs are under pressure from co-ordinated online campaigns, saying decisions should not be made on the back of “what someone says on Twitter”.

The caution comes in the wake of yesterday’s last-minute decision by the Gillard government to stop a super-trawler fishing in Australian waters on the back of a Labor caucus revolt that was influenced by Get Up! and Greenpeace.

Burke and Ludwig looked at the law as it stood and OK’d the enterprise until the Greenpeace/Getup! campaign frightened them. The company involved with the super trawler project had ticked all the boxes but that didn’t worry these pair.

They plan to table a new law in the house today just to break the business plan. If you listen carefully you can hear tens of thousands of business plans with associated infrastructure dollars and jobs being put back in the drawers, not to see the sun again until these idiots are well and truly gone.

Greenpeace and Getup! running the country – frightening.

Oh my God – she wants to pay $2 an hr

Shorten blames Coalition governments for union unrest, Swan thinks the economy is going gangbusters and Gillard lectures the mining community on education. Elsewhere, the Left claim Gina Reinhart wants to pay Australian workers $2 a day.

If ever a quantum leap in logic has been presented to the Australian public it is Shorten’s spin on union unrest. The Fair Work Act, based on the premise that unions deserve payback for getting the Rudd/Gillard government onto the treasury benches has started to impact badly on the economy as all of us long time ALP observers expected. Man-hours lost on the increase and industry reluctant to invest let alone employ people – overall, a standard ALP/unions in power result.

WORKING days lost due to industrial disputes have hit an eight-year high, with 101,700 working days lost in the June quarter.
The Australian Bureau of Statistics said it was the highest level of working days lost in one three-month period since June 2004.

Victorian Premier, Ted Baillieu, claims the CFMEU should pay damages – I agree.

THE nation’s most militant building union should be made to pay for the damage to business and the economy caused by its actions, according to Victorian Premier Ted Baillieu.

“Australians have been appalled to see the CFMEU’s behaviour. Thuggish behaviour, unruly behaviour, unlawful behaviour,” he said.

“If they’re going to trash the furniture they’re going to pay the bill.

“I also suggest that others who seem to regard unlawful and violent union practices as just part of the so-called industrial ballgame must also start showing proper respect for the law”.

Gina Rinehart’s comment’s drove everyone from the PM down to attack her over “paying people $2 an hour” statement like she was advocating we import African workers and pay them $2 an hour. They so missed the point, or they saw her point and felt they had to distract from the message in case voters also see the sense in her statement.

ADAM CREIGHTON in today’s Australian addresses the point;

Far from being loopy, Rinehart’s remarks reflect standard, even boring, economic theory, entwined with a classically liberal philosophy that unwieldy government undermines national and individual prosperity.

Rinehart’s observation that Australian wages are high compared with Africa’s prompted fury, but logic points out higher minimum wages and laws hampering businesses hiring and firing decisions bolster unemployment.

The Prime Minister’s response that paying people $2 an hour “is not the Australian way” not only grossly misrepresents Rinehart but is pompous, suggesting Africans pay each other miserly sums by choice, and ignorant, implying the costs of goods and services in Africa are similar to here.

Just another day under a reeling, incompetent government.

Floor price lowered

LABOR has moved to assuage business fears about the impact of the carbon tax by dumping the scheme’s controversial floor price, a change that could slash hundreds of millions of dollars from annual company costs.

Stage two of the ALP’s attempts to claw back in the polls and to neuter Abbott – their nemesis; not surprisingly, they still don’t get it. Stage 1, off-shore processing, only comes with some of the expert panel’s recommendations and thus has been set up to fail. That will become apparent soon, if it isn’t already.

This latest attempt isn’t going to help either. They have cut the floor price to calm down business who are not taken in by the government’s promises of limited disadvantage. Now some are happy, Combet is spinning like a top and I presume Wayne Swan is sitting in the dark somewhere wondering what has happened to his much touted ‘surplus’.

He will be working on the spin he needs to make a deficit sound like a surplus – just like he did with the last budget. We know, by precedence, that he won’t be working on fixing the problem.

It’s gone Wayne, on on the Political Expediency bus via Unintended Circumstances – a trade mark clearly owned by the ALP

Tony Abbott’s comment;

“If you can’t take the price for granted, you can’t take the revenue for granted,” the Opposition Leader said. “If you can’t take the revenue for granted you can’t rely on the compensation. No one can count on the compensation this government has promised them.”

No one can can count on any promises this government make

Unions must be auditable

A letter in Last Post in The Australian this morning underlines what is wrong with the debate on Gillard and the unions misappropriation of members funds. Until Unions are subject to the same public scrutiny as Company Directors then we are getting no where.

I wonder what those who regularly call for Labor to distance itself from union slush funds and unions in general, think about the Liberal Party’s close ties with big business and lobbyists seeking special treatment?

D. J. Fraser, Mudgeeraba, Qld

I left this reply in comments

Would that be close ties with big business where the Directors are audited and present open books on expenditure and income to public scrutiny? Your point is irrelevant until Unions are also publicly accountable for expenditure of their member’s money. Both sides use lobbyists but only the ALP and their union mates misdirect funds without telling their members.

CanDo’s popularity waning

Nearly half of Queensland voters believe Premier Campbell Newman’s cuts have gone too far, with support for the Liberal National Party plunging 12 percentage points since last month, a new opinion poll suggests.

Well of course the polls are down. Phase One of getting Queensland back in the black entails axing excessive public servants to a level where the state doesn’t have to borrow money to pay their wages. It also involves cut-backs in services and no one, particularly those who accept these services without thought of budgeting, likes this.

It’s par for the course that after taking over from ALP fiscal vandals, Conservative governments lose popularity while they square the books and pay back deficits. After everyone settles and the state starts moving again, increased investment and subsequent jobs brings the voters back. However, after a parliament or two of financial security, the voters get bored and experiment with another ALP government, thus maintaining the loop.

It was ever thus.

Back on deck

I spent yesterday driving up the Newell Highway on the last leg of driving back from Melbourne and a Regimental reunion. I note in today’s The Australian Melbourne claiming the most livable city in Australia status. I might agree if it wasn’t for the abysmal weather we had to endure.

My bride and I had intended to tour the Great Ocean Drive but locals kept on saying “if you don’t like this weather then be aware it comes from the West – it will simply be worse. We compromised and went down to Phillip Island – bad call. A sudden Western Port Bay/Great Southern Ocean combination storm dislodged the tent on the second night and let some rain in. At 0500 the Princess decamped to the car and I packed up vowing to drive north until we reached civilization. It wasn’t so much the zero Celsius, it was the unquantifiable ‘wind chill factor’ that detracted me from my normal chipper demeanour.

Yesterday morning we left Coonabarrabran with another zero on the car readout. Along side the zero was a little icon on the Climate Control display I hadn’t seen before – looked like a crystal snow flake. We had to look up the manual to read that it was a warning of the potential of ice on the road. It comes up whenever the temp hits zero.

Things just got better all day as the temperature on the road climbed while I listened to the ABC scrabbling to get activists on line who still believed that the boat people are actually refugees. They found them abundance and I listened spell-bound as they rattled on about torture, assassinations and deprivations that existed in Sri Lanka, Afghanistan and every where from whence our current crop of ‘better life with generous handouts’ mob came from.

Chopper Driver Houston’s recommendations were being picked apart looking for any basis to classify them as being of the ‘cruel Howard’ variety and there was some basis. The chattering class hated the thought of those who abuse our generous nature should be housed in tents in the tropics – oh the inhumanity of it all and then they might be housed in such an inhumane manner for as long as it would take to process a real refugee through UN channels.

I thought it was a great idea but then that’s just me, and I suspect, most of the country.

The debate is not over as the ALP appear not to be taking up all of the Coalition’s policies. We have to be very careful that Gillard’s about turn isn’t quite 180 degrees. Once on Narau or Manus Island the ‘better life with generous handouts’ mob need to be aware that the Government are really trying to stop them or they will reason that they can still achieve a better life by just enduring life on a tropical paradise for a year or two and then they can still win lotto.

The people smugglers and their clients will be very aware of this government’s incompetence in previous dealings with boat people and may well gamble on more of the same and that the government really don’t want to stop the boat people anyway, they just want the country to stop talking about them. Most boat people will vote for the weaker party and I simply don’t trust Gillard’s motives.

Still, it’s a start and gives Abbott something to work on.

Jones and Smith chat about Gillard, Thomson and Wilson

I have just listened to Alan Jones and Michael Smith talking about the Gillard/Thomson/Wilson cover-up

The fact that 30% of the voters are still with her must surely mean they are not aware of the debate.

If you aren’t aware go listen and think.

Jobs to go in Queensland

PUBLIC servants are preparing to unleash industrial mayhem on the state next month to protest against job cuts by the Newman Government.

A vote taken by public sector union members yesterday backed a “significant industrial campaign” involving more than 30,000 people at 1000 work sites, including hospitals, prisons, schools and transport service centres.

I sympathise with the public servants (I have a daughter worried about her long term prospects) but really, what is Newman to do?

The Beattie/Bligh governments have simply left us with a bloated public service as witnessed by the fact the Anna had to borrow money to pay their salaries.

Newman has to claw back billions of dollars to even approach financially responsible levels and we are going to have to pay. It will hurt us and services will be downgraded until he has a grip on the problem.

If the public servants wan’t to vent their spleen then they should go find Anna Bligh and tell her ‘thanks for screwing us over and having us live in a fools paradise’

  • Facebook