Slogans only OK for ALP

The Prime Minister attacked Tony Abbott’s resort to “three-word slogans” on border security, insisting her government was having success tackling people-smuggling across a range of policy levels.

Without delving too much into her “moving forward, fuel watch, grocery watch” sloganeering I think her last line is disingenuous to the extreme.

Who does she think she is kidding! “…having success tackling people-smuggling across a range of policy levels” would suggest the ALP are on top of the problem and nothing could be further from the truth.

Amanda Hodge has posted an article on the refugees “life style” seekers taking advantage of Gillard’s successful tackling of people smugglers.

…a high-ranking Pakistani official, also involved in anti-people-smuggling operations, denied the numbers were in decline and said the Gillard government’s recent family-friendly announcement would only encourage more movement.

“It’s increasing and the reason is very simple: you’re not doing anything positive to stop it,” the official said.

“You’re sending all the wrong signals. You’ve set up new centres in Adelaide and one near Perth to accommodate the child issues. If you’re going to be so friendly then of course you’re going to get more people.

Sending all the wrong signals is dead right.

21 Responses to Slogans only OK for ALP

  1. 1735099 says:

    Kev

    Now that the election’s over, we’ve heard much less of the mindless “stop the boats”.

    It would be a good time to stop treating asylum seekers as political collateral, and begin to consider them as human beings.

    We actually have a bipartisan approach in that both major parties see the issue simply as a political wedge.

    Wouldn’t it be great if they could speed up the processing, shut down the detention centres, and let these people get on with their lives. As I recall, it worked pretty well with 137,000 Vietnamese. That was, of course, in the days when the issue wasn’t used to blow the dog whistle. Little Johhny really started something in 2001.

    Given that in this country we take a whole .4% of the world’s refugees, I doubt anyone would notice – except perhaps the shock jocks and commentators like Blot and Blur.

    That’s wishful thinking, of course. There’s always 5% of the population paranoid enough to swallow the slogans. And given the balance in the house, both sides will play it for the political advantage they can gouge from this 5%.

    • Bob says:

      What percentage of the Viets came in on boats, Bobby?
      Nobody seems to have an issue with the flyers mate. They go through processes prior to making their way here. You still don’t get it do you?
      “Boaties” bypass all the the standard methods of seeking asylum and just turn up to take up residence, and others with your slant on things bend over backwards for them, ahead of the asylum seekers who have to go through the mincer.

  2. 1735099 says:

    Since you asked, a very similar percentage (10%) to the proportion of current arrivals on boats. Once on-shore, the vetting is exactly the same no matter what method of travel was used. You might also recall that in the days of the Vietnamese refugees the problem was ultimately solved by regional cooperation, which is precisely the approach being developed by the current government.
    The demonization of refugees for political gain on the basis of what method they used to get here is gutless and un-Australian, and needs to be called for what it is. Both major parties do it, and it works, much in the same way as the Jews were demonized by the Nazis for political gain in WW2.

  3. PeterW says:

    “…un-Australian…”

    Oh Mr hyperbole. What a boring and predictable old twat you are. Nazis too I see. No substance, no argument just a load of your usual bollocks.

    Isn’t there anything else for you to do in Toowoomba except recycle the same old tripe again and again?

  4. 1735099 says:

    Peter Whatever
    It’s a Pity you’ve never learned how to disagree with a point of view without abusing the person who articulates it. Most kids I’ve taught manage this by third grade.
    As for “anything else to do” – by the end of this week I’ll have worked 6am – 6pm each day, travelled 1500kms, worked with kids staff and parents in eight different school communities, across three school districts and submitted reports and recommendations on same day in each case. ( I don’t spend much time in Toowoomba – this post is iPadded from Charleville).
    Your responses to posts are always good for a laugh – if you find my opinions boring you could always ignore them.

  5. PeterW says:

    “…this post is iPadded from Charleville.”

    Ah, so my explanation of the benefits of wireless sank in – good to hear.

    That you work a 12 hour day makes me want to reach for a violin and a tissue…

    “…if you find my opinions boring…”

    No, not your opinions, but your wilfull ignorance.

  6. 1735099 says:

    Bob
    “benevolence?” – interesting use of words. From this I assume that you believe supporting kids with disabilities to attend school in the bush is an act of charity? The “charity” discourse of disability went out in the fifties. These kids have exactly the same rights to schooling as everyone else.
    As for my remuneration, my contract ensures that these same kids get the best service available for the dollar. Isn’t payment for services rendered one of the underlying principles of our free enterprise system?

    Peter Whatever
    Your definition of “ignorance” is an opinion held different from your own.

    • Bob says:

      Your writing method indicates that you believe you are benevolent in the fashion that you spend your time and therefore are worthy of a sound backslapping. I merely endeavoured to point out that you are carrying out the duties of your employment and all the time and effort are, in the end, for remuneration. If it wasn’t you it would be someone else with a smaller ego probably. What makes you think that a contract with you ensures the best outcome. I have found over the years that Government based contracts are quite often given to friends, family or those who will work at a figure cheap enough to achieve even the lowest quality with an appearance of giving adequate service. Conversely Government bodies have been known to expend huge amounts on poor quality services, merely to be appearing to be doing something constructive. Ring any bells?

  7. 1735099 says:

    Peter Whatever
    It is precisely my experience with wireless in the bush over the last four years that helps me understand the value of fibre, especially for allied health professionals in remote locations.

  8. 1735099 says:

    “Your writing method???”
    That’s as clear as mud. I doubt you would have used the word “benevolence” if I’d been working in the bush as a contract plumber, for example.
    You need to respond to that – you didn’t last time. You need to defend your argument that supporting kids with disabilities is benevolence, rather than simply work that should be done.
    Incidentally, I do some pro bono advocacy around disability – the money’s not all that significant.
    Last week I had a very pleasing result in a complaint against the Headmaster of an exclusive (and expensive private school) who treated the parent of a student with a disability in a manner that brought him before HREOC.
    He was paying his lawyer the going rate – not sure what it was, but probably close to four figures an hour.

    • Bob says:

      Bobby if you were working in the bush as a plumber and plumbing for lets say wives of deceased service personnel and doing it for free then it would be a benevolent act. Are we clear?
      When I used benevolence in the initial writing it was apparently a poor attempt at sarcasm….. clearly lost on you. Contributing your work with children would be considered benevolent. Pro bono advocacy (I assume with service personnel) is to be admired, but you pat yourself heartily on the back for what is clearly your chosen vocation and attempt to claim browny points for time and effort. I can hardly admire that trait.

  9. PeterW says:

    “Incidentally, I do some pro bono advocacy around disability…”

    The violins aren’t loud enough – now for the violas…

    But what the hell, will someone please give 17 whatever bobby red-herring the medal he’s been begging for in his self-aggrandizing sermons.

    “It is precisely my experience with wireless…”

    Oh, I nearly forgot about your ICT illiteracy. At least you got the iPad to work or did a 12 year old switch it on for you and give you a quick lesson on the touchscreen keyboard?

    And your wilful ignorance has been on display to the readers of this blog since you tapped out your first post.

    History is your particular weak point, especially anything related to WW2 and of course the Queensland education budget, but it’s recently been topped by the hilarity you’ve provided with your foray into school halls, pink batts, asylum seekers and ICT.

  10. 1735099 says:

    Bob
    Given that you’re unwilling or unable to admit that your use of the word “benevolence” in the context of your post reveals an antediluvian attitude to this segment of the population, I’ll spell it out for you.
    Back in the early seventies, when I started this work, many children with disabilities didn’t have the right to access schooling in Australia. Any schools that did exist for them were run by charities such as the Cerebral Palsied association (then called the Spastic Welfare League).
    The cliche used back then (and unchallenged by decades of Conservative federal governments) was that these kids were “unreceptive to education”.
    It seems you’re stuck in this headset – why else would you use “benevolence” to describe supporting them in regular schools?
    It took a Labor reformist government led by the much-maligned Gough Whitlam to pass legislation and provide funding to allow access to education for children with disabilities across the country.

    Peter Whatever
    Sorry I don’t fit your cliched view of a bitter old lefty railing at the world from a gentle retirement. One of the lessons I learned as a Nasho is that if you see something that’s not right you get off your arse and do something about it. Tossing abuse and insults at anyone you disagree with is generally counter-productive.

  11. Bob says:

    I seem to have got up your skirt Bobby. You have really gotten off track with your self indulgent ranting. Self admiration is high on your list of important traits isn’t it? Are seeking a mention on the the honours list, or attempting to talk down to people you see as lesser entities than yourself?

    The last sentence in your reply to Peter is sometimes true, but you seem to apply the idea to everyone but the Nasho from B company. I would have imagined that the NCOs at Porky would have paid out on you (frequently) and you would have shown them how counter-productive their methods were(sure). You got back home didn’t you, and the training you undertook and laud as the best you could have received often included the method you call “generally counter-productive”, is the reason you did.

    Can you please indicate with arrows or drawings where my post “You forgot to mention that you were highly remunerated for your benevolence” is pointed at, or singles out the children with whom you work. It is pointed at you for seeking applause and recognition for the way you spend your time albeit as a highly paid contracted public servant with a penchant for pushing his own barrow. You should realise that you are not unique in your job and when you pass or retire, you will be replaced within the week by someone who can do the job at least as well as you, or better…..probably someone not seeking recognition for their participation in the role.

  12. 1735099 says:

    Bob
    I’ll keep it simple.
    You wrote – “You forgot to mention that you were highly remunerated for your benevolence.
    You could have said “…..for your work”.
    But you used “benevolence”, which, if you look up the dictionary meaning, is defined as an act of charity. So either you don’t know the meaning of the word, or you think this work is charity. If it’s the second interpretation, you devalue these kids by using it – pretty offensive stuff.
    Which is it?

    • Bob says:

      Bobby boy, you are the one writing about your chosen vocation as if you should be patted on the back. This indicated to me that you claim that you are being benevolent in dealing with those you give assistance in the course of your daily employment. Your post spoke in general terms of children and parents and did not mention that your efforts were directed to children who face greater challenges than some of us. Now you are the one choosing to use these same children to attempt to shame me for my use of the language. I merely point out that you are very well paid to give the assistance that you attempt to claim browny points for, and are therefore not actually entitled to any greater recognition than other people in administative positions involved in your occupational responsibilities.
      If one of the children you write about were to read our posts, who would cause the greater ire, you trying to impress with your self importance or me for merely pointing out that you are highly paid to carry out your duties?

  13. PeterW says:

    “…as a Nasho…”

    Give it a rest, I was ‘in’ for many years longer than you bobby red-herring and I cherish the associations and experiences I had.

    But you couldn’t help yourself could you. It had to be uttered “I WAS A CONSCRIPT AND AN EVIL CONSERVATIVE DISSED ME – AND I’M NOT MATURE ENBOUGH TO DEAL WITH IT”

    That you are such a bitter old crone is of your making not the rest of the world’s.

    Your cloying self-promotion earns you nothing from my quarter, but yawning disinterest.

  14. 1735099 says:

    Peter Whatever
    “It had to be uttered “I WAS A CONSCRIPT AND AN EVIL CONSERVATIVE DISSED ME – AND I’M NOT MATURE ENBOUGH TO DEAL WITH IT”
    Uttered by you – not me. You’re the one with the cloying obsession. And shouting makes you look like you’ve lost it….
    As for self-promotion, I simply set you straight by telling you what I was doing when you (as usual) made a fool of yourself by assuming –
    “Isn’t there anything else for you to do in Toowoomba except recycle the same old tripe again and again?”
    “yawning disinterest”
    You keep responding to my posts.

  15. PeterW says:

    “Uttered by you – not me…”

    “…as a Nasho…”

    Like a needle stuck in a scratch on an old ’78′.

    “Your cloying self-promotion earns you nothing from my quarter, but yawning disinterest. You keep responding to my posts.”

    Again you demonstrate your inability to comprehend a simple sentence.

    It’s your “cloying self-promotion” which produces “yawning disinterest” in the rest of us.

    The rest of the content of your posts, inaccurate and dissembling as they are, produce mild amusement at your vacuous view of the world.

    Replying to them, like shooting fish in a barrel, provides occasional brief relief from the serious work of the day.

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