RIP Mates

We will remember

Camped at Eagle Nest near Sharks Bay WA

You can just see the glow of my laptop where I was working on a clients web sIte in Tassie hosted through Rumcorps.net servers in Dallas Texas. As good an office as any!

Whales off the NW Coast

A pod of about 20 whales come fast from astern and passed either side of the yacht, frightening hell out of us.

Fire on the road

No flames apparent so I hardly slowed down until I had travelled a hundred odd meters with no visibility. About the time I started to panic I came out the other side.

 

Queensland not happy

THE Queensland government, as host of last weekend’s G20 ­summit, is incensed over what it sees as an ill-informed, insulting speech from Barack Obama about climate change, the Great Barrier Reef and coal.

I don’t blame them, I was incensed as well that Obama turned an economic forum into a meeting of the Church of the Later Day Alarmists.

Mr Obama said on Saturday that climate change “here in ­Australia” means “longer droughts, more wildfires” and “the incredible natural glory of the Great Barrier Reef is threatened”.

Where on earth did he drag that from?

“I have not had a chance to go to the Great Barrier Reef and I want to come back, and I want my daughters to be able to come back, and I want them to be able to bring their daughters or sons to visit,” the President said.

Your kids and their kids and their kids ad infinitum will be able to visit the reef…it’ll still be here.  Cyclones and Crown of Thorns star fish are the biggest threat to the reef and it has recovered from everything thrown at it so far.

Give us a break, Bill

TONY Abbott should reveal the negative impacts of free trade with China, Bill Shorten says, accusing the government of “selective leaks to soften up the electorate” for painful concessions to Beijing.

Hypocrisy, thy name is ALP.  Bill, how about you reveal the negative impacts of the Joe Ludwig’s closure of the live export trade to Indonesia before you say anything about this deal with China.

It could could well help the cattle industry recover from your stuff-up.

Diggers being diggers

ONE of Australia’s leading combat battalions employed topless waitresses to serve drinks during an “Oktoberfest” party held at the unit’s Townsville base.

OMG the horror!  Hetrosexual behaviour - have to put a stop to that!

The event, at which the four civilian women were encouraged to remove their clothes in defi­ance of direct orders from the commanding officer of the 2nd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, is the latest in a line of recent military scandals.

OK, that’s a bit different then – the Corporal should be charged and punished but we shouldn’t be reading about it.  A minor disciplinary matter makes the national press because of an agenda that is not necessarily in the interests of the Army.

He was charged;

During a disciplinary hearing, Colonel Bassingthwaighte found the corporal guilty of this breach, stripped him of his rank and sentenced him to 14 days detention.

but it was thrown out.

After serving his time in a cell at Sydney’s Holsworthy Barracks, the corporal lodged a petition against his conviction with a ­senior army officer independent of 2RAR. This review found flaws with the legal advice provided to the battalion’s commanding officer, including that he should not have been able to pass judgment on a charge of disobeying his own order. The corporal’s sentence was quashed and his rank reinstated.

I would hazard a guess that the Corporal has peaked and I can’t see him making sergeant any time soon.  Not because he was involved with girls taking their tops off; not that he disobeyed a lawful command; but because he took the Commanding Officer to court and won on a legality that smells of political correctness.

That’s strange and puts aside hundreds of years of military discipline.  I would have a few charges from my wild youth that I should be able to have set aside based on this finding.  A lot of minor administrative matters within a battalion are detailed in what was known as Routine Orders and it was a chargeable offence to disobey Routine Orders.  These orders were signed by the CO.

Is this still the case – maybe a current serving soldier could comment.

Was the senior army officer independent of 2RAR within the Corporal’s chain of command and if not, does this now set a precedence where every soldier charged and  disciplined by his Commanding Officer has the right to complain to any passing officer and have offences set aside.

Not good.

Seems to me that lawyers are making it harder for Officers and NCOs to apply discipline and and that can only be bad for a professional army.

Nova Peris in the news

LABOR senator Nova Peris has asked federal police to investigate the leaking of private emails that led to allegations she sought taxpayer funding for a secret lover and sent him ­racially charged emails claiming white Australians “hate black people”.

That’s fine but I trust the AFP are also looking into the question of whether she actually used public monies to pay for Trinidadian sprinter Ato Boldon to visit Australia so they could pursue an extramarital affair.

Just curious.

Warren Mundine said taxpayers could ignore Senator Peris’s private life as long as they “got bang for the dollar”.

“If it’s true (she made racial comments), it was a silly statement and she needs to say something about that. Otherwise there’s nothing in it for me.”

Therein lies the problem. Warren is suggesting so long as Nova does a good job as a Senator then it doesn’t matter if she makes racist comments.

Not the point, Warren.  The point is; did she, or did she not use public monies to satisfy her libido?

Cattle producers launch class action

NORTHERN cattle producers and exporters have launched a class action against the commonwealth, challenging the “reckless’’ decision by the Gillard government in 2011 to ban live animal exports to Indonesia.

Northern Territory cattle producers Dougal and Emily Brett who run Waterloo Station, about 540km from Katherine, are the lead applicants. The couple had cattle worth about $1.4 million in their yards ready to be exported to Indonesia when trade was halted. The ban up-ended their lives and their industry.

The ban up-ended the lives of thousands of people and the industry and represents one of the worst decisions ever made by the Rudd/Gillard/Rudd debacle.  I was travelling through North West Western Australia and the Northern Territory shortly after the shock announcement and the hatred against the government was palpable.

Ludwig, the minister who closed down the industry, will never be welcomed west of Brisbane yet I notice he is still a Queensland Senator.  It’s a pity he can’t be held financially responsible for the decision but unfortunately, any costs awarded will just taken out of federal revenue and only people who remember will apportion the costs, albeit only in their mind, against the costs of electing an ALP government.

Australia never really recovered from the Whitlam experiment and now we have billions to sort out from the most recent ALP experiment.

Government protecting public

THE Immigration Department is no longer processing any humanitarian visa applications from Ebola-affected countries, which include Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea.

The government is also cancelling and refusing non-permanent or temporary visas held by people who haven’t yet departed these countries for Australia.

The Greens, of course, would rather we were all put in danger.

Greens immigration spokesperson Sarah Hanson-Young says it is a miserly, selfish and cruel announcement.

 “Banning refugees from fleeing west Africa is like shuttering up the windows while a house burns down,” Senator Hanson-Young said, calling for the decision to be reversed.

Shuttering up the windows could be better than setting the entire neighbourhood on fire.

It’s time now Gough

whitlamGough Whitlam, the 21st Australian prime minister, passed away earlier this morning. He served as PM between 1972 and 1975 before being sacked by the Governor-General and subsequently, by the electorate,  at the 1975 general election.

As a young Infantry Sergeant I was called before my Officer Commanding and formally asked if I would continue to serve without pay in the event that Fraser maintained his attempt to rid Australia of Whitlam and his decaying government and supply dried up.

I answered in the affirmative recognizing the country needed to stave off bankruptcy and only suggested if the stalemate continued then the Army needed a plan to feed my wife and child.

I have dreaded this day, not so much because of the man’s demise, but more because we now have to endure weeks of canonization by the media of a man who, at best, we can say, his road to hell was paved with good intentions.

The Left, and those who either ignore facts or make them up, will be working overtime to give him credit where none is due and to wash over his errors.

And they start;

He was good for women

Tanya Plibersek:

Gough’s reforms for women were landmark. They included the election of the first Labor woman to the House of Representatives, Joan Child, in 1974.

She means other than Dame Enid Lyons who was elected to the House in the early 40s.

He cut Tariffs 

Sure did.  Tim Colebatch explains;

John Stone, deputy secretary of Treasury at the time, wrote recently that the committee’s existence was kept secret even from Treasury. Stone wrote a memo endorsing lower tariffs as a goal, but arguing that an indiscriminate cut would leave excessively protected sectors unharmed, but close more vulnerable plants.

And sure enough;

A year later, after the tariff cuts, import volumes jumped by a third, and the current account deficit was here to stay. Manufacturing lost 138,000 jobs in two years, and high unemployment became entrenched. The tariff cuts were only one factor in all this, but they symbolised the defects in Whitlam’s “crash through or crash” style of decision-making.

He instituted free Uni education.

Sure did and those who gained by that move have reason to be complimentary to Gough but in life there are no free dinners and someone had to pay.  The taxpayer paid and in due course Hawke adjusted the scheme and brought in costs to students.

He brought the troops home from Vietnam.

No he didn’t.  All he did was bring home the few Training Team guys still left in country.  1 ATF had been withdrawn by the McMahon government before Whitlam cam to power.

From Wikipedia;

On 18 August 1971, Australia and New Zealand decided to withdraw their troops from Vietnam, with the Australian prime minister, William McMahon, announcing that 1 ATF would cease operations in October, commencing a phased withdrawal.

I’ve almost given up correcting Whitlam lovers on this one but as they maintain the rage, I will maintain telling them the truth.

Financial management.

Whitlam-Legacy

As mentioned above, his road to hell was paved with good intentions, but, like the Rudd/Gillard/Rudd government the great programs were never placed against the balance sheet to see if we could afford them.

We couldn’t.

In this graph from Catallaxy file Professor Sinclair says, Australia never recovered from the Whitlam era.  I might add Whitlam tried to fund his grandiose schemes but did so by trying to borrow money from the Arabs.  The Khemlani Affair put the icing on the cake as it became apparent to all that they were out of control.  It gave Fraser the impetus to deny supply that ended in Whitlam’s dismissal

 Whitlam opened up dialogue with China.

Yep. he sure did.  He visited China as Opposition leader in  June of 1971 and whereas establishing diplomatic relations with China had to be considered, I would have preferred he wait until our troops had been withdrawn or otherwise recovered from, or died of their wounds.  Troops were still in Vietnam (4RAR left in October 1971) and while our troops were being killed or wounded by the VC or North Vietnamese, these communist soldiers were just aiming the rifles.  China was busy making the AK 47s and loading the magazines and for the years from 1972 thru to 1975,  they rearmed North Vietnam, in partnership with the USSR, to enable the 1975 invasion.

I took it that Whitlam favoured the Chinese communists over the sacrifice of the Diggers and while he later had Jim Cairns as his deputy I can understand why.  If Whitlam was iffy, Jim Cairns was an out and out communist and did all he could to assist the communists to win the war.

I thought recognition was a bit early – wait until my mate’s bodies are cold in their grave, I thought at the time.

He instituted Multiculturalism.

Yep he did.  With the exception that the South Vietnamese who fought his communist mates weren’t included in his version of multiculturalism. He is quoted as saying;

“I’m not having hundreds of fucking Vietnamese Balts coming into this country with their religious and political hatreds against us!”

If the Vietnamese hated anybody, other than the communists who were busy murdering and raping their countrymen, it could only be politicians who said such things.  The religious Vietnamese he talks about were, on the main, Catholics with some Buddhists thrown in.  The only reason he could hate them so is because they were fighting the communists.

As a further example of his political leanings he denied any reports of violations in communist SE Asia;

‘In September 1978, Whitlam addressed a conference in Canberra where he declared that he did not accept the validity of any of the reports about human rights violations in Vietnam, Cambodia or Laos. He was particularly emphatic about Cambodia, declaring: “I make bold to doubt all the stories that appear in the newspapers about the treatment of people in Cambodia.”‘

He supported Jim Cairns until he had to sack him over treasury matters.  He never sacked him while he was courting the communists.

Australia’s Dr Jim Cairns and the Soviet KGB
by John Ballantyne
National Observer (Council for the National Interest, Melbourne),
No. 64, Autumn 2005, pages 52-63.

When he was a senior Cabinet minister in the Whitlam Government, Cairns set out to use his high office to promote Soviet foreign policy aims. In 1973, when he was Minister for Overseas Trade and Secondary Industry, he sponsored a visit to Australia of representatives of communist North Vietnam. On April 26 — the day after Anzac Day — Cairns was photographed with his guests in the Sydney Town Hall, surrounded by Viet Cong flags and a huge picture of dictator Ho Chi Minh.

In 1974, official letterhead stationery of the Australian WPC described Cairns both as President of the Committee of World Peace Councillors in Australia and as Deputy Prime Minister. One such letter, dated 2 September 1974, advertised a visit to Australia later that month of a WPC delegation, headed by long-time KGB agent and WPC leader, Romesh Chandra.

It is worth remembering that Australia’s Constitution (section 44) clearly states: “Any person who … is under any acknowledgement of allegiance, obedience, or adherence to a foreign power … shall be incapable of being chosen or of sitting as a senator or member of the House of Representatives.” Cairns’s loyalties to a foreign power — and an enemy foreign power at that — should have automatically disqualified him from sitting as a member of parliament, let alone from becoming Deputy Prime Minister.

It is little wonder, then, that when Cairns became Deputy PM on 10 June 1974, the then US Ambassador to Australia, Marshall Green, warned Labor Prime Minister Gough Whitlam of Washington’s alarm that Cairns might have access to classified information on US bases in Australia. Whitlam assured Green that Cairns had not asked about the functions of the US bases and would not be briefed on the matter.

I never looked up to him, always thought he and I were on different sides but he certainly caused a lot of debate and even though he could never fund his grandiose ideas he did at least have them.  It wasn’t an untimely death but I dread the media over the period between now and his state funeral and will stay away from the ABC lest I throw something at my expensive TV in frustration at the lies that are about to wash over us.

November 11 1975 was a big relief and a highlight in my life.

Vale Gough.

Good luck, Joel

LABOR frontbencher Joel Fitzgibbon says the party must attract better candidates and boost its campaigning in rural Australia, as well as revitalising its policies for farmers and regional communities, or it will fail to regain government.

“Australia has 44 rural electorates,” Mr Fitzgibbon said. “The Labor Party holds just five of them.

“Two are held by independents. The Tories (He means the Coalition – Tories are Brits!)  hold the rest — some 84 per cent. In the past 30 years, Labor has held no more than 13 rural electorates. This must change — not for Labor’s sake, but for the sake of all rural communities.”

Here’s a tip Joel.  Tell the rural communities that under no circumstances will the ALP ever, ever close down an entire rural industry as they did with the live cattle export trade, based on an ABC TV show, and if, and it’s a big if, they believe you, you might stand a chance of gaining some rural seats.

For that matter, how the hell do they even hold five seats – what are the voters in those electorates thinking?

Considering that Joel was called an auto electrician in a suit by General Cantwell I can’t see him recognizing, let alone addressing, ALP failures.  With Shorten in denial and the ALP continually blocking the Coalition’s  attempts to wind back spending, the punters can see they haven’t learnt any lessons from the election.

Joe Ludwig, who was the Senator responsible for closing down the live cattle trade, is still in the Senate – a veritable time bomb ticking quietly as he waits for the opportunity to totally stuff up some other industry.

Tick…tick…tick

 

Murderer dictating Church Investments

THE priest at the forefront of the Anglican Church’s push to dump millions of dollars in fossil fuel investments on ethical grounds was also responsible for the most ­notorious act of terrorism on Australian soil.

In June 1978, members of the Ananda Marga organisation were implicated by a police informant, Richard John Seary, but his evidence has been discredited. A member of Ananda Marga, Evan Pederick, claimed in 1989 that he had carried out the Hilton bombing on the orders of another member, Tim Anderson. Both men went to prison, but Anderson was acquitted on appeal in 1991. Pederick served eight years in prison.

Evan Pederick is now an Anglican Priest obviously having found God whilst incarcerated for the murder of three Australians. In the  late 70s his God was a part of the Amanda Marga Sect formed in India in 1955 and responsible for the deaths of many who disagreed with the their teachings.

Today, Father Pederick heads a parish in the southern Perth suburb of Cannington and has been the driving force of the church’s sell-off of holdings in coal, oil and gas companies.

Pederick says;

“The church of God simply can’t profit from an industry that damages God’s creation or which destroys the lives and livelihoods of human beings,” Father Pederick told The Australian.

“If we do, we deserve the blowtorch on our belly for it.”

We already know he is capable of murdering people because of his politics, so any motion of his to avoid profit from an industry  which destroys the lives of human beings has to be considered as rank hypocrisy.

Over and above that fact, the industry he is railing against has raised the living standards of billions of humans, created millions of jobs and brought about serious input to several nation’s GDP.

I wonder if the Anglican Church are embarrassed about this?

They should be but I doubt it.

 

Edmund Rice protests

Apparently today, 30 odd schools in the Edmund Rice Australian Network across Australia are going to use students as political pawns to protest the detention of children in Australia’s detention centres.

From St Bernard’s College web site;

This Friday 17th October at 11.35 am students, parents and staff will sit in silent protest in the school grounds with their mouths taped and their hands tied. We aim to raise awareness in our communities of the shameful policies of the Australian Government and the Federal Opposition that are affecting the mental health of more than one thousand children currently being held in detention.

I wonder what action the schools took when thousands drowned under the Rudd/Gillard/Rudd government and why aren’t they protesting at the fact that the parents of these kids in detention created the circumstances affecting their mental health by placing their kids in danger on the high seas in the first place.

Oh for the days of my youth when teachers taught language, science an maths and left their politics at home.

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